Twenty-Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Indian Commissioners, 1892 United States Board of in Commissioners

ISBN: 9781331505686

Published: September 27th 2015

Paperback

174 pages


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Twenty-Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Indian Commissioners, 1892  by  United States Board of in Commissioners

Twenty-Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Indian Commissioners, 1892 by United States Board of in Commissioners
September 27th 2015 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, ZIP | 174 pages | ISBN: 9781331505686 | 3.72 Mb

Excerpt from Twenty-Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Indian Commissioners, 1892For the last ten years there has been, we believe, a growing conviction on the part of the people of the United States that the solution of the Indian problem is toMoreExcerpt from Twenty-Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Indian Commissioners, 1892For the last ten years there has been, we believe, a growing conviction on the part of the people of the United States that the solution of the Indian problem is to be attained, not by any single piece of legislation and not by the adoption of any visionary plan of reform, but by the systematic application to it of those principles of justice, fair dealing, and popular education which lie at the foundation of our system of government.

Over 30,000 Indians have now become citizens of the United States, and more than 50,000 others, through application for land in severalty, have declared their intention to become citizens. The application of the laws already enacted by Congress, before many years shall have elapsed, will breakup the reservations and establish a very large number of the Indians upon holdings of their own. Since the Indians are thus on the road to citizenship in the United States, the position to which the logic of our institutions destines them, is it not clear that the supreme duty of the United States Government is thoroughly to educate its wards?The American people believe in popular education.

Since the Indians are to enter upon the duties of citizenship, they should be prepared for these duties by systematic education. The history of efforts already made in educating the Indians proves conclusively that education and social intercourse with educated people very rapidly remove the customs and the worst tendencies which have marked Indian life as savage life. Far more effectively than campaigning against him does education kill the Indian and give us in his place the American citizen.

The United States Government has for some years been engaged in a work of education among the Indians which is more comprehensive in its scope, more practically efficient in its results, and more hopeful in the outlook it gives upon the future of the Indians than any other work which the Government has attempted for them.

We urge the Congress of the United States to make still larger appropriations for boarding schools upon the reservations, for educating Indians at the Eastern schools, where they come in touch with civilized life, and for day schools on the reservation. We believe that the enlightened common sense and the conscience of our country call for the settling of the Indian question by the influences of the school-house rather than by the influences of the barracks and the campaign. And we respectfully urge upon Congress that instead of reducing the appropriation for Indian schools it should make a marked increase in that appropriation for the coming year.On the lowest motive of economy, if upon no higher ground, we might urge the wisdom of increased appropriation for schools.

Statistics show that it is far cheaper to maintain a small army of school teachers than a large army to follow the hostiles upon the warpath. Larger appropriations for schools, for industrial training, for practical instruction in farming, will make the Indians self-supporting, self-respecting citizens. This will lead directly to smaller appropriations for rations to feed lazy Indians who will not work, and less expense for soldiers to watch the discontented and the vicious.But upon higher grounds than the mere saving of money we urge upon Congress the obligation to furnish schools for Indians imposed upon us by specific treaties and by the claim which the weaker and the more ignorant have upon the stronger and more prosperous.

Let provision be made at once for the elementary, common-school, and industrial education of all Indian children.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com



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